DariusBashar.com

Director, Producer and Occasional Blogger.

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David Fincher: OK, yeah, for good reason. It’s interesting, I just grew up in a really interesting and bizarre place in a bizarre time. There was a real nexus of things. From third grade, I was making movies in 16mm, and every year, in film class – and everybody took film – they’d give you a song, a 45 and they’d say, “Make a film to this song,” because there was no sync sound. So you’d go out and shoot stuff with your friends, and you’d cut it and it was made to that song. So when MTV came along, people went, “We want you to make a film to this song,” and I thought, “I actually know how to do that. That may actually be the only thing I do know how to do.” That was a good gig for me.

Mark Salisbury: So did you treat them as a film school?

DF: Yeah. I hate to say this because I took millions of dollars from people to do these things. But the day that they started to put your name on it was a horrible day for me. I just thought it was so cool that you could try out this stuff and no one would ever … you know, they’d blame it on Michael Jackson. [audience laughs]

MS: But movies were always the goal, when you were making videos like Express Yourself, that Metropolis thing.

DF: Yeah, we thought that was good fun. I don’t know, she came up with that idea. She was like, “I wanna do Metropolis,” and I thought, it’s her million bucks.

David Fincher (via pablolf)

(via pablolf)

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I enrolled in NYU film school and went there for literally two days. I walked into this class and the teacher said, ‘If anyone is here to write Terminator 2, walk out the door.’ And I thought, well, that is not a good way to start. What if I want to write Terminator 2? What if someone sitting next to me wants to write it? But he was instantly saying, ‘We write serious films here.’ But Terminator 2 is a pretty awesome movie.

-Paul Thomas Anderson on film school

(via cinemasquared)

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ventureandvirtue:

Original handwritten script for Spike Lee’s ‘Do the Right Thing’

Not sure if I believe that this is real, but regardless it’s still pretty cool.

ventureandvirtue:

Original handwritten script for Spike Lee’s ‘Do the Right Thing’

Not sure if I believe that this is real, but regardless it’s still pretty cool.

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thefilmstage:

"I think that in order to find reality, each must search for his own universe, look for the details that contribute to this reality that one feels under the surface of things. To be an artist means to search, to find and look at these realities. To be an artist means never to look away."

Akira Kurosawa
March 23, 1910 — September 6, 1998

See his stunning hand-painted storyboards.

(Source: kurosawa-akira)

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thefilmstage:

Happy 75th birthday, Francis Ford Coppola!
- Watch him discuss filmmaking in a one-hour talk with Martin Scorsese from 1997.
- Watch a feature-length documentary on the making of The Godfather trilogy.
- Watch a one-hour documentary on the film school generation of the 70’s, including Coppola, Scorsese, Brian De Palma, George Lucas, and Steven Spielberg.
- Watch a behind-the-scenes documentary on Coppola's dream project.

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cinephilearchive:

Due to unprecedented demand, Steven Soderbergh has given The San Francisco Film Society permission to release this video that was recorded initially only for archival purposes. The full transcript is also provided. —Steven Soderbergh: The State of Cinema Video & Transcript 

(via steven-soderbergh)

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a-bittersweet-life:

Cinematographers aren’t born. They sort of develop over time. And you need to give yourself as much experience as you can to develop as a cinematographer, so that your skill base is as broad as it possibly can be, that your experience is as broad as it possibly can be, so that you can then bring all of that to whatever project you are doing.
Sean Bobbitt

a-bittersweet-life:

Cinematographers aren’t born. They sort of develop over time. And you need to give yourself as much experience as you can to develop as a cinematographer, so that your skill base is as broad as it possibly can be, that your experience is as broad as it possibly can be, so that you can then bring all of that to whatever project you are doing.

Sean Bobbitt

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film-dot-com:

"We’re a narrative-driven species. The same way that if you were sitting around a campfire and someone started telling a story, and there was no sense or shape to the story, eventually you would tell them to shut up or hit them. We want stories. It’s why somebody painted on a cave in France thirty thousand years ago. They were trying to say something about their life and their world. Am I frustrated by the box that narrative filmmaking seems to be in, which is relatively small? Yes. There hasn’t been a narrative leap in filmmaking in maybe fifty years, maybe more. ‘Hiroshima Mon Amour’, maybe, or ‘Persona’." 
– STEVEN SODERBERGH
READ OUR FULL “VISITORS” INTERVIEW WITH STEVEN SODERBERGH & GODFREY REGGIO

film-dot-com:

"We’re a narrative-driven species. The same way that if you were sitting around a campfire and someone started telling a story, and there was no sense or shape to the story, eventually you would tell them to shut up or hit them. We want stories. It’s why somebody painted on a cave in France thirty thousand years ago. They were trying to say something about their life and their world. Am I frustrated by the box that narrative filmmaking seems to be in, which is relatively small? Yes. There hasn’t been a narrative leap in filmmaking in maybe fifty years, maybe more. ‘Hiroshima Mon Amour’, maybe, or ‘Persona’."

– STEVEN SODERBERGH

READ OUR FULL “VISITORS” INTERVIEW WITH STEVEN SODERBERGH & GODFREY REGGIO

(via steven-soderbergh)

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alternativecandidate:

"I think editing is in a weird place right now. Technology has opened the door for a lot of over-editing on a micro level, and while you would think the ability to get to an assembly/early cut faster would allow for a longer period of judging the entire piece as a whole, editing on a macro level has never been worse. I leave it to you to decide why this is, but consider that Sam O’Steen, editor of Chinatown, wrote a terrific book about editing called Cut to the Chase, and one of the many smart things he says is: Movie first, scene second, moment third. So I see a lot of contemporary films in which this credo is not followed—or even understood—and no one has ever asked basic questions like: What is the ultimate purpose of this scene in the movie? What would happen if it was gone? Assuming it absoultely has to stay, is it in the right place? What would happen if we put it somehwere else? Or inverted the structure of the scene itself? Or had one of the speaking characters within it not speak? Or took this scene and some others around it and turned them into a sequence? And on and on and on, because when you’re in the editing room, anything is possible.”
Steven Soderbergh

alternativecandidate:

"I think editing is in a weird place right now. Technology has opened the door for a lot of over-editing on a micro level, and while you would think the ability to get to an assembly/early cut faster would allow for a longer period of judging the entire piece as a whole, editing on a macro level has never been worse. I leave it to you to decide why this is, but consider that Sam O’Steen, editor of Chinatown, wrote a terrific book about editing called Cut to the Chase, and one of the many smart things he says is: Movie first, scene second, moment third. So I see a lot of contemporary films in which this credo is not followed—or even understood—and no one has ever asked basic questions like: What is the ultimate purpose of this scene in the movie? What would happen if it was gone? Assuming it absoultely has to stay, is it in the right place? What would happen if we put it somehwere else? Or inverted the structure of the scene itself? Or had one of the speaking characters within it not speak? Or took this scene and some others around it and turned them into a sequence? And on and on and on, because when you’re in the editing room, anything is possible.”

Steven Soderbergh

(via steven-soderbergh)

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The essence of cinematography can be learned through stills photography. Pick up a stills camera and become adept.

Seamus McGarvey (cinematographer)

(Source: jamesgrantbrown)