These are a few stills from a new short film I am working on. The film is based on a spoken word poem that personifies Toronto as a woman. Sort of like a love poem to the city. The visual elements of the film come to life through a variety of real Toronto women that we meet and filmed over the course of 3 days in August. 

a-bittersweet-life:

A Conversation with David Lynch by Mike Figgis. In this 20 minute exchange with the always intriguing filmmaker, David Lynch reveals how he got started in filmmaking, his idea of creativity being like fishing, and, most importantly, the thoughts and processes behind his distinct style of filmmaking.

The whole reason I got into film, I’ve told this story a million times, but I was working on a painting in a studio at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, of a garden at night. And the plants in the dark night painting began to move, and I heard a wind. And I thought, “Oh, this is interesting. A moving painting.” And that was the thought that started it.

David Lynch

a-bittersweet-life:

The film of tomorrow will not be directed by civil servants of the camera, but by artists for whom shooting a film constitutes a wonderful and thrilling adventure.
François Truffaut

a-bittersweet-life:

The film of tomorrow will not be directed by civil servants of the camera, but by artists for whom shooting a film constitutes a wonderful and thrilling adventure.

François Truffaut

a-bittersweet-life:

A director is a kind of idea and taste machine; a movie is a series of creative and technical decisions, and it’s the director’s job to make the right decisions as frequently as possible. Shooting a movie is the worst milieu for creative work ever devised by man. It is a noisy, physical apparatus; it is difficult to concentrate—and you have to do it from eight-thirty to six-thirty, five days a week. It’s not an environment an artist would ever choose to work in. The only advantage is has is that you must do it, and you can’t procrastinate…
The best education in film is to make one. I would advise any neophyte director to try to make a film by himself. A three-minute short will teach him a lot. I know that all the things I did at the beginning were, in microcosm, the things I’m doing now as a director and producer. There are a lot of noncreative aspects to filmmaking which have to be overcome, and you will experience them all when you make even the simplest film: business, organization, taxes, etc., etc. It is rare to be able to have an uncluttered, artistic environment when you make a film, and being able to accept this is essential.
The point to stress is that anyone seriously interested in making a film should find as much money as he can as quickly as he can and go out and do it. And this is no longer as difficult as it once was. When I began making movies as an independent in the early 1950s I received a fair amount of publicity because I was something of a freak in an industry dominated by a handful of huge studios. Everyone was amazed that it could be done at all. But anyone can make a movie who has a little knowledge of cameras and tape recorders, a lot of ambition and—hopefully—talent. It’s gotten down to the pencil and paper level. We’re really on the threshold of a revolutionary new era in film.
Stanley Kubrick

a-bittersweet-life:

A director is a kind of idea and taste machine; a movie is a series of creative and technical decisions, and it’s the director’s job to make the right decisions as frequently as possible. Shooting a movie is the worst milieu for creative work ever devised by man. It is a noisy, physical apparatus; it is difficult to concentrate—and you have to do it from eight-thirty to six-thirty, five days a week. It’s not an environment an artist would ever choose to work in. The only advantage is has is that you must do it, and you can’t procrastinate…

The best education in film is to make one. I would advise any neophyte director to try to make a film by himself. A three-minute short will teach him a lot. I know that all the things I did at the beginning were, in microcosm, the things I’m doing now as a director and producer. There are a lot of noncreative aspects to filmmaking which have to be overcome, and you will experience them all when you make even the simplest film: business, organization, taxes, etc., etc. It is rare to be able to have an uncluttered, artistic environment when you make a film, and being able to accept this is essential.

The point to stress is that anyone seriously interested in making a film should find as much money as he can as quickly as he can and go out and do it. And this is no longer as difficult as it once was. When I began making movies as an independent in the early 1950s I received a fair amount of publicity because I was something of a freak in an industry dominated by a handful of huge studios. Everyone was amazed that it could be done at all. But anyone can make a movie who has a little knowledge of cameras and tape recorders, a lot of ambition and—hopefully—talent. It’s gotten down to the pencil and paper level. We’re really on the threshold of a revolutionary new era in film.

Stanley Kubrick

This quote makes a lot more sense when you realize Kubrick is referring to classical music, which was his favourite genre.

This quote makes a lot more sense when you realize Kubrick is referring to classical music, which was his favourite genre.

“During the shooting of a scene the director’s eye has to catch even the minutest detail. But this does not mean glaring concentratedly at the set. While the cameras are rolling, I rarely look directly at the actors, but focus my gaze somewhere else. By doing this I sense instantly when something isn’t right. Watching something does not mean fixing your gaze on it, but being aware of it in a natural way. I believe this is what the medieval Noh playwright and theorist Zeami meant by ‘watching with a detached gaze.’”

“During the shooting of a scene the director’s eye has to catch even the minutest detail. But this does not mean glaring concentratedly at the set. While the cameras are rolling, I rarely look directly at the actors, but focus my gaze somewhere else. By doing this I sense instantly when something isn’t right. Watching something does not mean fixing your gaze on it, but being aware of it in a natural way. I believe this is what the medieval Noh playwright and theorist Zeami meant by ‘watching with a detached gaze.’”

A refreshingly candid conversation with legendary film directors Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola, as they reminisce about breaking into the industry.

Shot in 1997.

a-bittersweet-life:

Some directors go in with a machine gun, shoot, like, 40 hours. I’m not wasting my fucking time. This is not random art. It’s about being in tune with the scene and finding it.
Steve McQueen

Brilliant!

a-bittersweet-life:

Some directors go in with a machine gun, shoot, like, 40 hours. I’m not wasting my fucking time. This is not random art. It’s about being in tune with the scene and finding it.

Steve McQueen

Brilliant!

(via thehausucat)

God I love this country!!!  (at 21 Steps Whistler)

God I love this country!!! (at 21 Steps Whistler)